Queen Victoria
"Young Head"
Gold Sovereigns
The reign of Victoria (1837-1901), niece of William IV, was long enough to prompt three distinctive portraits. These depicted her as the young woman of 18 on her ascension to the throne, as a mourning widow on her golden jubilee in 1887 and as an elderly empress in 1893 The initial reverse type for gold coins was the shield and crown motif, supplemented on the sovereign with a heraldic wreath. This was succeeded in 1871 by the scene of St. George slaying the dragon
In the case of the St George reverse, the date appears on the reverse with the mintmark on the obverse, just below the portrait. With the Shield reverse the date appears below Victoria's portrait on the obverse and the mintmark on the reverse.
Young Heads were introduced in 1838, for list of mintages please see Sovereign Mintages Page
Queen Victoria
Young Head

1871-1887
Introduction of St George Reverse
Mintage figures indicate total for both St George and Shield sovereigns issued, no separate figures were kept.
London issued both types until 1874 whilst the branch mints continued until 1887
Sydney Branch Started Production of Imperial Sovereigns in 1871
Year London Sydney
1871 Proof (1) Extremely Rare
1871 8,767,250 2,814,000
Melbourne Branch Opened in 1872
Year London Sydney Melbourne
1872 13,486,708 1,815,000 748,180
1873 2,368,215 1,478,000 752,199 (1)
1874 520,713 1,899,000 (1) 1,373,298
1875 2,122,000 1,888,405 (1)
1876 3,318,866 1,613,000 (1) 2,124,445 (1)
1877 1,590,000 1,487,316 (1)
1878 1,091,275 1,259,000 2,171,457 (1)
1879 20,013 1,366,000 2,740,594 (1)
1880 3,650,080 1,459,000 3,053,454
1881 1,360,000 2,234,800
1882 1,298,000 2,465,781
1883 1,108,000 2,050,450
1884 1,769,635 1,595,000 2,942,630
1885 717,723 1,486,000 2,967,143
1886 1,667,000 2,902,131
1887 1,000,000 1,916,424
  1. St George Reverse Only



Sources

Main